liste: SALSA: Caribbean Seeks Cultural Partnerships for Developm

SALSA: Caribbean Seeks Cultural Partnerships for Development

Write haof XML files: Yacine Khelladi <yacine@yacine.net>
Fecha: mié ene 12 2005 - 14:10:54 AST

-------> MESSAGE ORIGINAL

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: PRESS RELEASE #14/2005
Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2005 08:32:40 -0400
From: CARICOM

No. 14/2005
Date: 11 January 2005

Caribbean Seeks Cultural Partnerships for Development

No. 14/2005
Date: 11 January 2005

Caribbean Seeks Cultural Partnerships for Development

(CARICOM Secretariat, Georgetown, Guyana) The Caribbean Community
(CARICOM) Secretariat is taking the lead in inviting partnerships to
strengthen the Caribbean Region's capacity for cultural resilience or
renewal and to enhance the real economic gains accruing to regional
economies and their people from their cultural resources. An interactive
session dealing with the subject was convened by the CARICOM Secretariat
in association with various Caribbean partner organisations on Tuesday
(January 11) day two of the United Nations International Meeting on the
Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States (SIDS) in
Mauritius.
The panel discussion titled, Vulnerability and Cultural Resilience in
the Caribbean was moderated by Mr. Cletus Springer, Sustainable
Development Consultant from Saint Lucia and featured presentations by
Vice Chancellor Emeritus of the University of the West Indies (UWI),
Caribbean scholar and cultural icon, Professor Hon. Rex Nettleford;
Deputy Dean of Graduate Studies and Research at the UWI, St. Augustine
campus, Dr. John Agard; and Senior Lecturer at UWI, Mona, Dr. Michael
Witter.
Opening the event, CARICOM Secretary-General His Excellency Mr. Edwin
Carrington expressed the view that culture is not only the framework
within which the socio-economic development of our societies can be
successfully pursued, but also the effective tool for doing so in a
sustainable way. He added that it was recognised in CARICOM that as the
Community moves to establish a CARICOM Single Market and Economy (CSME),
culture is central to economic and social development efforts in the
Region. This, he said, can be seen from the place culture occupies in
the Charter of Civil Society, which instrument is enshrined in the
Revised Treaty of Chaguaramas, establishing the Community including the
CSME.

"Caribbean Small Island Developing States faced with serious
vulnerabilities recognise the potential of our culture to reduce their
susceptibility to external shocks and to build their resilience to the
dramatic changes and powerful intrusions of the current world economy
and society," Mr. Carrington noted. He added: "Indispensable to the
building of this resilience is the forging of partnerships among the
Caribbean peoples themselves both those at home as well as in the
Diaspora. And this, even as we strike alliances with the rest of the world."

The Secretary-General also used the occasion to pay tribute to the
spirit and contributions of the late former Ambassador of Mauritius to
Brussels, His Excellency Raymond Charles, who he described as a pioneer
who struggled successfully to bring issues pertaining to culture and
cultural cooperation within the discussions and agreements between the
European Union (EU) and African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) States.
Mr. Carrington also expressed the deep regret felt by the Caribbean at
the fact that plans and arrangements to have several top cultural groups
and musicians from the Region perform at the cultural events associated
with the SIDS conference and participate in the 'Community Vilaj'
showcase fell through at the last minute because anticipated donor
funding did not materialise.

Meanwhile, a presentation on Caribbean partnerships made to the forum by
Programme Manager for Culture at CARICOM Sceretariat, Dr. Hilary Brown,
disclosed that Caribbean SIDS required some US$16 million over four
years to fund various projects for strengthening cultural capacity and
putting in place institutional mechanisms and an enabling mechanism to
promote the development of culture and cultural forms in a sustainable
and economic way.

The availability of this long term financing, she pointed out, was
critical to support the development of arts and culture in the
Caribbean. The next steps in this regard include dialogue with
organisations and potential partners to obtain support for the overall
partnership and the development and elaboration of individual projects
dealing with specific aspects of cultural development. Dr. Brown noted
that currently CARICOM, the Caribbean Forum of ACP States (CARIFORUM),
the CARIFORUM Support Fund, Caribbean Export and arts and culture
agencies are funding various culture initiatives in the Caribbean.
In the feature presentation Professor Nettleford welcomed the placing of
culture within a sustainable development framework, adding that
sustainable development speaks to resilience or renewable resources and
nothing is more renewable than the human mind. He pointed to some
developmental interpretations that have placed factors like education
and culture in the non-productive area of national development but drew
attention to the increasing acceptance of the notion of cultural industries.

However, while the idea of cultural industries, professor Nettleford
said, has evolved largely in terms of their critical linkage to what is
regarded as the highly developmental tourist industry, the concept of
culture having its own inner logic and consistency is still missing from
the consciousness of many persons. Understanding culture in the
Caribbean in the context of sustainable development, ecological
integrity and environmental health, he pointed out, turns on the fact
that human beings themselves are creatures of nature who are as
endangered as mangroves, coastline habitats, birds and animals.
Human vulnerability and that of Caribbean small island states he noted,
rests, among other things, on import dependency, lack of education, lack
of opportunity for self development and self empowerment, the
exploitation of labour, susceptibility to communicable or lifestyle
diseases, lack of social services and material resources, and racism
which leads to identity crises and denial of legitimacy to religious
expressions such as Santeria, Zionism, Pukkumina and Rastafari.
"The way culture has formed in the Caribbean has ancestral pedigree,"
Professor Nettleford declared, noting that Caribbean culture has emerged
from the common history of a people over 500 years which included the
experience of slavery and indentureship.

Dr. Witter gave an overview of the worsening economic risks which
Caribbean SIDS have faced in the ten years since the Barbados Programme
of Action for the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing
States, which mandated among other things, the development of indices of
vulnerability. He pointed to the fact that since Barbados, SIDS have
lost preferential markets on which they depended greatly for survival.
He also drew attention to a phenomenon formerly known as the 'Singapore
paradox', which he renamed in the Caribbean context, the 'Trinidad
paradox'. This is a situation, he said, in which increased earnings,
from oil in the case of Trinidad, has made the country even more prone
or vulnerable to external shocks. Additionally, Dr. Witter said, the
vulnerability of Caribbean SIDS has worsened with what he described as
the peculiar international exchange of human resources - the best
migrating to the developed countries and the worst being deported back
to Caribbean societies. He concluded that the Mauritius meeting must
move towards deciding concrete strategies to enhance national efforts to
build resilience.

The main thrust of the presentation by Dr. Agard was the fact that
indices of social, economic, environmental vulnerability cannot be
developed nor analysed separately as is currently the case. This, given
the inextricable linkages among the areas, all of which he pointed out,
was to advance human well being and reduce poverty especially as it
concerns health and disease, environmental security, social service
delivery and cultural security.

He explored statistical evidence that pointed to the critical linkages
between environmental factors - from the increasing frequency of
hurricanes to the depletion of coral reefs - and their impact on the
goal of achieving human well being and economic development.

The Caribbean is participating in other activities pertaining to culture
and social development as the Meeting continues throughout the week.

-end-

Contact: Huntley Medley
Email: realhunter_1@yahoo.com

-------> ENGLISH (WARNING: THE FOLLOWING IS A NOT REVISED AUTOMATIC
TRANSLATION)

Original Message Subject: PRESS RELEASE #14/2005 Date: Wed, 12 Jan
2005 08:32:40 -0400 From: CARICOM

No. 14/2005
Date: 11 January 2005

Caribbean Seeks Cultural Partnerships for Development

No. 14/2005
Date: 11 January 2005

Caribbean Seeks Cultural Partnerships for Development

(CARICOM Secretariat, Georgetown, Guyana) The Caribbean Community
(CARICOM) Secretariat is taking the lead in inviting partnerships to
strengthen the Caribbean Region's capacity for cultural resilience or
renewal and to enhance the real economic gains accruing to regional
economies and their people from their cultural resources. An interactive
session dealing with the subject was convened by the CARICOM Secretariat
in association with various Caribbean partner organisations on Tuesday
(January 11) day two of the United Nations International Meeting on the
Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States (SIDS) in
Mauritius.
The panel discussion titled, Vulnerability and Cultural Resilience in
the Caribbean was moderated by Mr. Cletus Springer, Sustainable
Development Consultant from Saint Lucia and featured presentations by
Vice Chancellor Emeritus of the University of the West Indies (UWI),
Caribbean scholar and cultural icon, Professor Hon. Rex Nettleford;
Deputy Dean of Graduate Studies and Research at the UWI, St. Augustine
campus, Dr. John Agard; and Senior Lecturer at UWI, Mona, Dr. Michael
Witter.
Opening the event, CARICOM Secretary-General His Excellency Mr. Edwin
Carrington expressed the view that culture is not only the framework
within which the socio-economic development of our societies can be
successfully pursued, but also the effective tool for doing so in a
sustainable way. He added that it was recognised in CARICOM that as the
Community moves to establish a CARICOM Single Market and Economy (CSME),
culture is central to economic and social development efforts in the
Region. This, he said, can be seen from the place culture occupies in
the Charter of Civil Society, which instrument is enshrined in the
Revised Treaty of Chaguaramas, establishing the Community including the
CSME.

"Caribbean Small Island Developing States faced with serious
vulnerabilities recognise the potential of our culture to reduce their
susceptibility to external shocks and to build their resilience to the
dramatic changes and powerful intrusions of the current world economy
and society," Mr. Carrington noted. He added: "Indispensable to the
building of this resilience is the forging of partnerships among the
Caribbean peoples themselves both those at home as well as in the
Diaspora. And this, even as we strike alliances with the rest of the world."

The Secretary-General also used the occasion to pay tribute to the
spirit and contributions of the late former Ambassador of Mauritius to
Brussels, His Excellency Raymond Charles, who he described as a pioneer
who struggled successfully to bring issues pertaining to culture and
cultural cooperation within the discussions and agreements between the
European Union (EU) and African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) States.
Mr. Carrington also expressed the deep regret felt by the Caribbean at
the fact that plans and arrangements to have several top cultural groups
and musicians from the Region perform at the cultural events associated
with the SIDS conference and participate in the 'Community Vilaj'
showcase fell through at the last minute because anticipated donor
funding did not materialise.

Meanwhile, a presentation on Caribbean partnerships made to the forum by
Programme Manager for Culture at CARICOM Sceretariat, Dr. Hilary Brown,
disclosed that Caribbean SIDS required some US$16 million over four
years to fund various projects for strengthening cultural capacity and
putting in place institutional mechanisms and an enabling mechanism to
promote the development of culture and cultural forms in a sustainable
and economic way.

The availability of this long term financing, she pointed out, was
critical to support the development of arts and culture in the
Caribbean. The next steps in this regard include dialogue with
organisations and potential partners to obtain support for the overall
partnership and the development and elaboration of individual projects
dealing with specific aspects of cultural development. Dr. Brown noted
that currently CARICOM, the Caribbean Forum of ACP States (CARIFORUM),
the CARIFORUM Support Fund, Caribbean Export and arts and culture
agencies are funding various culture initiatives in the Caribbean.
In the feature presentation Professor Nettleford welcomed the placing of
culture within a sustainable development framework, adding that
sustainable development speaks to resilience or renewable resources and
nothing is more renewable than the human mind. He pointed to some
developmental interpretations that have placed factors like education
and culture in the non-productive area of national development but drew
attention to the increasing acceptance of the notion of cultural industries.

However, while the idea of cultural industries, professor Nettleford
said, has evolved largely in terms of their critical linkage to what is
regarded as the highly developmental tourist industry, the concept of
culture having its own inner logic and consistency is still missing from
the consciousness of many persons. Understanding culture in the
Caribbean in the context of sustainable development, ecological
integrity and environmental health, he pointed out, turns on the fact
that human beings themselves are creatures of nature who are as
endangered as mangroves, coastline habitats, birds and animals.
Human vulnerability and that of Caribbean small island states he noted,
rests, among other things, on import dependency, lack of education, lack
of opportunity for self development and self empowerment, the
exploitation of labour, susceptibility to communicable or lifestyle
diseases, lack of social services and material resources, and racism
which leads to identity crises and denial of legitimacy to religious
expressions such as Santeria, Zionism, Pukkumina and Rastafari.
"The way culture has formed in the Caribbean has ancestral pedigree,"
Professor Nettleford declared, noting that Caribbean culture has emerged
from the common history of a people over 500 years which included the
experience of slavery and indentureship.

Dr. Witter gave an overview of the worsening economic risks which
Caribbean SIDS have faced in the ten years since the Barbados Programme
of Action for the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing
States, which mandated among other things, the development of indices of
vulnerability. He pointed to the fact that since Barbados, SIDS have
lost preferential markets on which they depended greatly for survival.
He also drew attention to a phenomenon formerly known as the 'Singapore
paradox', which he renamed in the Caribbean context, the 'Trinidad
paradox'. This is a situation, he said, in which increased earnings,
from oil in the case of Trinidad, has made the country even more prone
or vulnerable to external shocks. Additionally, Dr. Witter said, the
vulnerability of Caribbean SIDS has worsened with what he described as
the peculiar international exchange of human resources - the best
migrating to the developed countries and the worst being deported back
to Caribbean societies. He concluded that the Mauritius meeting must
move towards deciding concrete strategies to enhance national efforts to
build resilience.

The main thrust of the presentation by Dr. Agard was the fact that
indices of social, economic, environmental vulnerability cannot be
developed nor analysed separately as is currently the case. This, given
the inextricable linkages among the areas, all of which he pointed out,
was to advance human well being and reduce poverty especially as it
concerns health and disease, environmental security, social service
delivery and cultural security.

He explored statistical evidence that pointed to the critical linkages
between environmental factors - from the increasing frequency of
hurricanes to the depletion of coral reefs - and their impact on the
goal of achieving human well being and economic development.

The Caribbean is participating in other activities pertaining to culture
and social development as the Meeting continues throughout the week.

- end-

Contact: Huntley Medley Email: realhunter_1@yahoo.com

-------> ESPAÑOL (ATENCION: LA SIGUIENTE ES UNA TRADUCCION AUTOMATICA NO
REVISADA)

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: PRESS RELEASE #14/2005
Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2005 08:32:40 -0400
From: CARICOM

No. 14/2005 Fecha: el 11 de enero de 2005

El Caribe busca las sociedades culturales para el desarrollo

No. 14/2005 Fecha: el 11 de enero de 2005

El Caribe busca las sociedades culturales para el desarrollo

(secretaría de CARICOM, Georgetown, Guyana) la secretaría del
Caribe de la comunidad (CARICOM) está tomando el plomo en sociedades
de invitación para consolidar la capacidad del Caribe de Region's
para la resistencia o la renovación cultural y para realzar a los
aumentos económicos verdaderos que se acrecientan a las economías
regionales y a su gente de sus recursos culturales. Una sesión
interactiva que se ocupaba del tema fue convocada por la secretaría
de CARICOM en la asociación con varias organizaciones del Caribe del
socio el el día dos de martes (de enero el 11) de la reunión
internacional de Naciones Unidas sobre el desarrollo sostenible de los
estados que se convertían de la isla pequeña (SIDS) en Isla
Mauricio. La discusión del panel titulada, la vulnerabilidad y la
resistencia cultural en el Caribe fueron moderadas por Sr. Cletus
Springer, consultor sostenible del desarrollo de Santo Lucia y
presentaciones ofrecidas de Vice Chancellor honorario de la
universidad de Indias del oeste (UWI), erudito del Caribe e icono
cultural, profesor Hon. Rex Nettleford; Diputado decano de los
estudios y de la investigación en el UWI, campus del St. Augustine,
el Dr. Juan Agard del graduado; y conferenciante mayor en UWI, Mona,
el Dr. Michael Witter. Abriendo el acontecimiento, Sr. Edwin
Carrington de secretario general His Excellency de CARICOM expresó la
opinión que la cultura es no solamente el marco dentro de el cual el
desarrollo socioeconómico de nuestras sociedades puede ser perseguido
con éxito, pero también la herramienta eficaz para hacer tan de una
manera sostenible. Él agregó que fue reconocido en CARICOM que como
la comunidad se mueve para establecer un solo mercado y una economía
(CSME) de CARICOM, cultura es central a los esfuerzos del desarrollo
económico y social en la región. Esto,él dijo, se puede ver de la
cultura del lugar ocupa en la carta de la sociedad civil, que el
instrumento se engarza en el tratado revisado de Chaguaramas,
estableciendo a la comunidad incluyendo el CSME.

los estados que se convierten de la isla pequeña "Caribbean
hechos frente con vulnerabilidades serias reconocen el potencial de
nuestra cultura de reducir su susceptibilidad a los choques externos y
de construir su resistencia a los cambios dramáticos y a las
intrusiones de gran alcance de la economía mundial y de la sociedad
actuales, " Sr. Carrington observó. Él agregó:
"Indispensable al edificio de esta resistencia es la forja de
sociedades entre la gente del Caribe ellos mismos amba ésos en el
país así como en el diaspora. Y esto, incluso mientras que pulsamos
alianzas con el resto del world."

El secretario general también utilizó la ocasión para pagar tributo
al alcohol y a las contribuciones del último embajador anterior de
Isla Mauricio a Bruselas, su excelencia Raymond Charles, a que él
describió como pionero que luchó con éxito para traer las ediciones
que pertenecían a la cultura y a la cooperación cultural dentro de
las discusiones y los acuerdos entre la unión europea (EU) y los
estados (ACP) del africano, del Caribe y pacíficos. Sr. Carrington
también expresó el pesar profundo sentido por el Caribe en el hecho
de que los planes y los arreglos para hacer que varios grupos y
músicos culturales superiores de la región se realicen en los
acontecimientos culturales asociados a la conferencia de SIDS y
participen en el 'Community Vilaj' el escaparate cayó a
través a última hora porque el financiamiento anticipado del donante
no materializó.

Mientras tanto, una presentación en las sociedades del Caribe hechas
al foro cercaEl encargado de programa para la cultura en CARICOM
Sceretariat, el
Dr. Hilary Brown, divulgó que SIDS del Caribe requirió algún USS16
millón sobre cuatro años financiar varios proyectos para consolidar
capacidad cultural y poner en mecanismos institucionales del lugar y
un mecanismo que permitía para promover el desarrollo de la cultura y
formas culturales de una manera sostenible y económica.

La disponibilidad de este financiamiento a largo plazo, ella precisó,
era crítica apoyar el desarrollo de artes y de la cultura en el
Caribe. Los pasos siguientes en este respeto incluyen diálogo con
organizaciones y socios del potencial para obtener la ayuda para la
sociedad total y el desarrollo y la elaboración de los proyectos
individuales que se ocupan de aspectos específicos del desarrollo
cultural. El Dr. Brown observó que actualmente CARICOM, el foro del
Caribe de estados ACP (CARIFORUM), el fondo de la ayuda de CARIFORUM,
exportación del Caribe y artes y agencias de la cultura están
financiando varias iniciativas de la cultura en el Caribe. En el
profesor de la presentación de la característica Nettleford dio la
bienvenida a colocación de la cultura dentro de un marco sostenible
del desarrollo, agregando que el desarrollo sostenible habla a la
resistencia o a los recursos reanudables y nada es más reanudable que
la mente humana. Él señaló a algunas interpretaciones de desarrollo
que han puesto factores como la educación y la cultura en el área no
productiva del desarrollo nacional pero dibujó la atención a la
aceptación de aumento de la noción de industrias culturales.

Sin embargo, mientras que la idea de industrias culturales, profesor
Nettleford dicho, se ha desarrollado en gran parte en términos de su
acoplamiento crítico a qué se mira como la industria turística
altamente de desarrollo, el concepto de la cultura que tiene su propia
lógica y consistencia internas todavía está faltando del sentido de
muchas personas. Cultura que entendía en el Caribe en el contexto del
desarrollo sostenible, de la integridad ecológica y de la salud
ambiental, él precisó, gira el hecho de que los seres humanos ellos
mismos son las criaturas de la naturaleza que están como puesto en
peligro como mangles, habitat de la línea de la costa, pájaros y
animales. Vulnerabilidad humana y la de los estados pequeños del
Caribe de la isla que él observó, de los restos, entre otras cosas,
en dependencia de la importación, la carencia de la educación, la
carencia de la oportunidad para el desarrollo del uno mismo y el
empowerment del uno mismo, la explotación del trabajo, la
susceptibilidad a las enfermedades comunicables o de la forma de vida,
la carencia de servicios sociales y de recursos materiales, y el
racismo que conduce a las crisis de la identidad y a la negación de
la legitimidad a las expresiones religiosas tales como Santeria,
sionismo, Pukkumina y Rastafari. la manera del "The que la
cultura ha formado en el Caribe tiene pedigrí ancestral, "
Profesor Nettleford declaró, observando que la cultura del Caribe ha
emergido de la historia común de una gente sobre 500 años que
incluyeron la experiencia de la esclavitud y del indentureship.

El Dr. Witter dio una descripción de los riesgos económicos de
empeoramiento a que SIDS del Caribe han hecho frente en los diez años
desde el programa de Barbados de la acción para el desarrollo
sostenible de los estados que se convertían de la isla pequeña, que
asignaron por mandato entre otras cosas, el desarrollo de índices de
la vulnerabilidad. Él señaló al hecho de que desde Barbados, SIDS
han perdido los mercados preferenciales de los cuales dependieron
grandemente para la supervivencia. Él también dibujó la atención a
un fenómeno conocido antes como el 'Singapore paradox', cuál
él retituló en el contexto del Caribe, el 'Trinidad
paradox'. Ésta es una situación,él dijo, en cuál aumentó
ganancias,del aceite en el caso de Trinidad, ha hecho el país aún más
propenso o vulnerable a los choques externos. Además, el Dr. Witter
dicho, la vulnerabilidad de SIDS del Caribe se ha empeorado con lo que
él describió como el intercambio internacional peculiar de recursos
humanos - la mejor migración a los países desarrollados y al peor
que eran deportados de nuevo a sociedades del Caribe. Él
concluyó que la reunión de Isla Mauricio debe moverse hacia decidir
a estrategias concretas para realzar esfuerzos nacionales de construir
resistencia.

El empuje principal de la presentación del Dr. Agard era el hecho de
que los índices de social, económico, la vulnerabilidad ambiental no
puede ser desarrollada ni ser analizada por separado al igual que
actualmente el caso. Esto, dado los acoplamientos inextricables entre
las áreas, que él precisó, debía para avanzar bienestar humano y
para reducir pobreza especialmente mientras que se refiere a salud y
enfermedad, seguridad ambiental, entrega del servicio social y
seguridad cultural.

Él exploró la evidencia estadística que señaló a los
acoplamientos críticos entre los factores ambientales - de la
frecuencia de aumento de huracanes al agotamiento de los filones
coralinos - y su impacto en la meta de alcanzar bienestar humano y el
desarrollo económico.

El Caribe está participando en otras actividades que pertenecen a la
cultura y al desarrollo social a medida que la reunión continúa a
través de la semana.

- extremo

Contacto: Email De Huntley Medley: realhunter_1@yahoo.com

-------> FRANCAIS (ATTENTION: CECI EST UNE TRADUCTION AUTOMATIQUE NON
REVISEE

-------- Message Original Subject : PRESS RELEASE # 14/2005 Date :
Wed, 12 Jan 2005 08:32:40 -0400 From : CARICOM

Numéro 14/2005 Date : 11 janvier 2005

La Caraïbe cherche des associations culturelles pour le
développement

Numéro 14/2005 Date : 11 janvier 2005

La Caraïbe cherche des associations culturelles pour le
développement

(secrétariat de CARICOM, Georgetown, Guyane) le secrétariat
des Caraïbes de la Communauté (CARICOM) prend la tête dans des
associations d'invitation pour renforcer la capacité des Caraïbes de
Region's pour la résilience ou le renouvellement culturelle et
pour augmenter les vrais gains économiques s'accroissant aux
économies régionales et leurs personnes de leurs ressources
culturelles. Une session interactive traitant le sujet a été
assemblée par le secrétariat de CARICOM en association avec de
divers organismes des Caraïbes d'associé le jour deux de mardi
(janvier 11) de la réunion internationale des Nations Unies sur le
développement soutenable des états se développants de petite île
(SIDS) en îles Maurice. La discussion de panneau intitulée, la
vulnérabilité et la résilience culturelle dans les Caraïbes ont
été modérées par M. Cletus Springer, consultant en matière
soutenable de développement de Saint Lucia et présentations
décrites par Vice Chancellor honoraire de l'université des Indes
occidentales (UWI), disciple des Caraïbes et icône culturelle,
professeur Hon. Rex Nettleford ; Député le doyen des études de
diplômé et de recherche à l'UWI, campus de rue Augustine, Dr. John
Agard ; et conférencier aîné à UWI, Mona, Dr. Michael Witter.
Ouvrant l'événement, M. Edwin Carrington de sécrétaire général
His Excellency de CARICOM était à du avis que la culture est non
seulement le cadre dans lequel le développement socio-économique de
nos sociétés peut être avec succès poursuivi, mais également
l'outil efficace pour faire ainsi d'une manière soutenable. Il a
ajouté qu'on l'a identifié dans CARICOM qui comme la Communauté se
déplace pour établir un marché unique de CARICOM et une économie
(CSME), culture est central aux efforts de développement économique
et social dans la région. Ceci dit-il peut être vu de la culture
d'endroit occupe dans la charte de la société civile, que
l'instrument est enchâssé dans le Traité révisé de Chaguaramas,
établissant la Communauté comprenant le CSME.

les états se développants de petite île "Caribbean confrontés
aux vulnérabilités sérieuses identifient le potentiel de notre
culture de réduire leur susceptibilité aux chocs externes et
d'établir leur résilience aux changements dramatiques et aux
intrusions puissantes de la économie mondiale et de la société
courantes, " ; M. Carrington remarquable. Il a ajouté :
"Indispensable au bâtiment de cette résilience est la pièce
forgéee des associations parmi les peuples des Caraïbes elles-mêmes
les deux ceux à la maison aussi bien que dans la Diaspora. Et ceci,
même pendant que nous frappons des alliances avec le reste du
world." ;

Le sécrétaire général avait l'habitude également l'occasion pour
rendre hommage à l'esprit et aux contributions du défunt ancien
ambassadeur des îles Maurice à Bruxelles, son excellence Raymond
Charles, qu'il a décrite en tant que pionnier qui a lutté avec
succès pour apporter des issues concernant la culture et la
coopération culturelle dans les discussions et des accords entre
l'union européenne (EU) et les états d'Africain (ACP), des Caraïbes
et Pacifiques. M. Carrington a également exprimé un vif regret senti
par les Caraïbes au fait que des plans et des arrangements pour faire
participer plusieurs groupes et musiciens culturels supérieurs de la
région exécuter aux événements culturels liés à la conférence
de SIDS et au 'Community Vilaj&#39 ; l'étalage est tombé à
travers à la dernière minute parce que le placement prévu de
donateur n'a pas matérialisé.

En attendant, une présentation sur des associations des Caraïbes
faites au forum prèsLe directeur de programme pour la culture à CARICOM
Sceretariat, Dr.
Hilary Brown, a révélé que SIDS des Caraïbes a exigé d'un certain
USS16 million sur quatre ans de placer de divers projets pour
renforcer la capacité culturelle et mettre les mécanismes en place
institutionnels et un mécanisme permettant pour favoriser le
développement de la culture et des formes culturelles d'une manière
soutenable et économique.

La disponibilité de ce financement à long terme, elle a précisé,
était critique pour soutenir le développement des arts et de la
culture dans les Caraïbes. Les prochaines étapes à cet égard
incluent le dialogue avec des organismes et des associés de potentiel
pour obtenir le soutien de l'association globale et du développement
et l'élaboration de différents projets traitant des aspects
spécifiques du développement culturel. Dr. Brown a noté
qu'actuellement CARICOM, le forum des Caraïbes des états ACP
(CARIFORUM), les fonds de soutien de CARIFORUM, exportation des
Caraïbes et arts et agences de culture placent de diverses
initiatives de culture dans les Caraïbes. Dans le professeur de
présentation de dispositif Nettleford a fait bon accueil au placement
de la culture dans un cadre soutenable de développement, ajoutant que
le développement soutenable parle à la résilience ou aux ressources
renouvelables et rien n'est plus renouvelable que l'esprit humain. Il
s'est dirigé à quelques interprétations développementales qui ont
placé des facteurs comme l'éducation et la culture dans le domaine
non productif du développement national mais a appelé l'attention
sur l'acceptation croissante de la notion des industries culturelles.

Cependant, alors que l'idée des industries culturelles, professeur
Nettleford dit, a évolué en grande partie en termes de leur
tringlerie critique à ce qui est considéré comme l'industrie du
tourisme fortement développementale, le concept de la culture ayant
sa propres logique et uniformité intérieures manque toujours de la
conscience de beaucoup de personnes. Culture d'arrangement dans les
Caraïbes dans le contexte du développement soutenable, de
l'intégrité écologique et de la santé environnementale, il a
précisé, allume le fait que les êtres humains eux-mêmes sont des
créatures de nature qui sont en tant que mis en danger comme
palétuviers, habitats de littoral, oiseaux et animaux.
Vulnérabilité humaine et celle de petits états des Caraïbes d'île
qu'il a notés, de repos, entre autres, sur la dépendance
d'importation, le manque d'éducation, le manque d'occasion pour le
développement d'art de l'auto-portrait et l'habilitation d'art de
l'auto-portrait,
l'exploitation du travail, la susceptibilité aux maladies
contagieuses ou de style de vie, le manque de services sociaux et de
ressources matérielles, et le racisme qui mène aux crises
d'identité et au démenti de la légitimité aux expressions
religieuses telles que Santeria, sionisme, Pukkumina et Rastafari. la
manière de "The que la culture a formée dans les Caraïbes a le
pedigree héréditaire, " ; Professeur Nettleford a déclaré,
notant que la culture des Caraïbes a émergé de l'histoire commune
d'un peuple sur 500 ans qui ont inclus l'expérience de l'esclavage et
de l'indentureship.

Dr. Witter a donné une vue d'ensemble des risques économiques de
détérioration aux lesquels SIDS des Caraïbes ont faits face au
cours des dix ans depuis que le programme des Barbades de l'action
pour le développement soutenable des états se développants de
petite île, qui ont exigé entre autres, le développement des index
de la vulnérabilité. Il a indiqué que depuis les Barbades, SIDS ont
perdu les marchés préférentiels dont ils ont dépendu
considérablement pour la survie. Il a également appelé l'attention
sur un phénomène autrefois connu sous le nom de 'Singapore
paradox&#39 ;, ce qu'il a retitré dans le contexte des Caraïbes, le
'Trinidad paradox&#39 ;. C'est une situation dit-il dans ce qui a
augmenté des revenus,à partir de l'huile dans le cas du Trinidad, a
rendu le pays bien
plus enclin ou vulnérable aux chocs externes. En plus, Dr. Witter
dit, la vulnérabilité de SIDS des Caraïbes a empiré avec ce qu'il
a décrit comme échange international particulier des ressources
humaines - la meilleure migration aux pays développés et au plus
mauvais étant expulsés de nouveau aux sociétés des Caraïbes. Il a
conclu que la réunion des îles Maurice doit se déplacer vers
décider des stratégies concrètes pour augmenter des efforts
nationaux d'établir la résilience.

La poussée principale de la présentation par Dr. Agard était le
fait que des index de social, économique, la vulnérabilité
environnementale ne peut pas être développée ni analysée
séparément de même qu'actuellement le cas. Ceci, donné les
tringleries inextricables parmi les secteurs, qu'il a précisés,
devait pour avancer le bien-être humain et pour réduire la pauvreté
particulièrement pendant qu'elle concerne la santé et la maladie, la
sécurité environnementale, la livraison de service social et la
sécurité culturelle.

Il a exploré l'évidence statistique qui s'est dirigée aux
tringleries critiques entre les facteurs environnementaux - de la
fréquence croissante des ouragans à l'épuisement des récifs de
corail - et leur impact sur le but de réaliser le bien-être humain
et le développement économique.

La Caraïbe participe à d'autres activités concernant la culture et
le développement social pendant que la réunion se poursuit tout au
long de la semaine.

- end -

Contact : Huntley Medley courrier électronique :
realhunter_1@yahoo.com
Nearby Sat Jan 15 09:27:56 2005

Este archivo fue generado por hypermail 2.1.8 : mié jul 20 2005 - 11:43:36 AST